| Behavior of the electromagnetic radiation in a local time-spatial domain

The celestial bodies (like the Earth) are rotating in the warped by the celestial body itself stationary space of the surrounding local “time-spatial domain”.

Fig. 9.1. Rotation of the celestial bodies into the stationary space of the local “time-spatial domain

In the local time-spatial domain “near the Earth’s surface”, the speed of light in vacuum (in the “ECI coordinate system”) is a constant, which corresponds to the constant local intensity of the gravitational field. However, in the frame of reference related to the Earth’s surface “light speed anisotropy” (the difference in the speed of light, depending on the direction of the light beam), is a real fact. It is due to the rotation of the celestial body in the stationary “empty space”, where the electromagnetic radiation propagates. The experiments “One-way determination of the speed of light” in the reference system related to the Earth’s surface undoubtedly confirm that the measured speed of light between two fixed points on the Earth’s surface in direction from “East to West” is higher than the measured speed of light in direction “West to East”. This difference corresponds to the linear speed of the Earth’s surface at this latitude. It means that the measured speed of light in different frames of reference is different and obeys to it – it is a subject of the Newtonian mechanics and Galilean relativity. That is why, the considered above experiments One-way light speed determination”, “Sagnac’s experimentandMichelson-Gale-Pearson experiment are actually evidence that the measured speed of light in the “local time-spatial domain” is not the same for all frames of reference.

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